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1950's Reprint Currier & Ives "Low Water In The MississippI"
Item #: WR289
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This is a 1950's reprint of the Currier & Ives lithograph titled "Low Water In The Mississippi." This sheet print is smaller than the originals, measuring 15 3/8" wide and 11 13/16" tall. The original version of this print was done by James Merrit Ives and Fanny Palmer, and was a hand colored lithograph. In the foreground, a black family of four adults and five children dance to the music of a banjo in front of their modest living quarters. Behind the servants quarters is the large plantation home. A man and woman can be seen walking in the yard, while another man can be seen descending the front steps. Both of the buildings are situated along the Mississippi River. Along the banks of the river snags can be seen sticking up out of the water. This was due to the erosion of the bank, causing the trees to fall into the water. Depicted on the river are a stern wheeler, side wheeler and a flat bottom boat. The stern wheeler is traveling downstream, while the flat bottom boat and the side wheeler travel upstream. The side wheeler, named the ROB E LEE, is shown traveling at speed, crowded with passengers on all three decks. The overall impression is that of a relaxing summer evening somewhere down south on the Mississippi River. The print is in overall good condition, no stains, tears, rips or other damage. The colors remain very bright and vibrant.
Shipping Weight: 1 lb
Your Price $40.00 USD


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